Codfish’s Rise to Internet Fame

Happy Easter everyone. It’s really fitting how I’m making a post about the OG Bahnie himself, Codfish. The winner of GBBB 2018, 2017 Australian Champ, Sydney Royale Champ and some other accolades to his name. But he didn’t just come out of nowhere. How did this man with 450,000 subscribers on YouTube get started? This is Codfish’s Rise to Internet Fame.

A HUMBLE MAN WITH HUMBLE BEGINNINGS:

Codfish started his YouTube channel under the name BunnyF1uff. He would often refer to his subscribers as “Bahnies” as there was a term thrown around the beatboxing community known as “Mahnie” which is just money with a bit of flare to it to make it unique to beatboxers.

We all start out as terrible beatboxers but over time, we develop and become better and eventually, some of us become champions. This is no exception for Codfish. He replied to every ounce of love on the video and was humble about it. The bass is nowhere near where it is now but this was just 4 years ago. He’s improved insanely. That was just 5 months of beatboxing but he wasn’t scared to share with others. He already had an idea to continue uploading his content and he is one of the most well-known beatboxers now and it all started with this video.

While Codfish wasn’t known back then, when he started to get well-known, people started to create more beatboxing content in video games with voice chat and Codfish was part of the reason for this. This video is what pushed him and others to start beatboxing outside of their comfort zone. There was a lot of potential for it to grow and grow it did.

Beatboxing parties are more of a thing now where you just take turns freestyling and showcasing. This was Codfish’s first party and I believe that it still played a major contribution to the growth of the beatboxing content on YouTube. People weren’t producing this sort of content until Codfish did it first. No one wants to be the first but be the first he did.

A SUDDEN BURST OF GROWTH:

Ep. 25 of the beatboxing in COD Lobbies is significant as it’s the earliest video on Codfish’s channel to hit 1 million views. He was uploading pretty consistently and there’s no real apparent reason why it spiked here but this was definitely one of the first videos to really boost Codfish’s popularity.

MODERN DAY CODFISH:

Those two videos are two of Codfish’s most viewed videos on his channel. What they show is a representation of Codfish’s currently fully fleshed out style. This was 2 years ago and he’s still sticking to the bass-heavy style that we all know him for in his routines. He rarely freestyles when he beatboxes and always knows what routines to perform. He’s always prepared when he gets on that stage and it really shows in those two videos.

THE FIRST TASTE OF BATTLING:

Everyone was absolutely hyped about Australian champs because of Codfish’s debut (and his face reveal). We had never seen him battle on stage before but we knew that his style would be very good when it came to battle as if he needed to improvise, he could do so really easily. He would go on to battle and lose in the semifinals to eventual winner CLR.

His GBBB 2017 wildcard would be just as impressive as he uses the same ferocity in this wildcard as his previous. This video was also uploaded directly after the previous one so there’s not much development in his style but it’s still impressive for only being his second wildcard ever.

This video is the most video on his channel and for good reason. People missed the old COD beatboxing videos so when people heard that Codfish expanded into CSGO, people went crazy all over this video because there was a YouTuber that played CSGO and beatboxed who was as nice as Codfish. He showcases a ton of routines in this video and really gives people a good listen to the amount of content that he has.

When you get one of the coolest beatboxers with a bunch of legends, champions of their respective countries and the tag team of Mad Twinz, you get this. This video is absolutely insane with all the beatboxers in that party. This was another emergence of parties becoming popular again. If you can get the right people, you can create something truly spectacular.

A NEW CHAMPION IS CROWNED:

So far, Codfish has won the Sydney Royale 7TS, 2017 Australian Champs and GBBB 2018. The king has been crowned and he really deserved it. The stage presence, bass, musicality and technicality all add up. The originality is there with his routines and unique style.

THE CODFISH EXPANSION PACK:

He has since moved on to Rust which hasn’t gotten as much attention for the simple fact that it’s not as popular of a game, and WW2 which has amassed over 2 million views. He has said that he will get back to making videos since GBBB is over. I can’t wait to see what he has in store for the future. Maybe World Champs?  Who knows? Only time will show the true potential of this beatboxing powerhouse.

This post took a little while to make and is dedicated to Codfish for inspiring many beatboxers that I know of today. Links to his social media will be below. Other than that, thanks for reading.

MAXIMUM RESPECT

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/BunnyF1uff/featured

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CodfishBeatbox/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CodfishBeatbox

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/codfishbeatbox/

Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/codfishbeatbox

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/codfishbeatbox

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Bigman’s Rise to Internet Fame

Looking back on 2017, there’s one name that stands out a lot, not only in the beatboxing community but in the general public. Going into 2018, he’s going to be a force at GBBB 2018 and a favourite to win. His name is Bigman. With an amazing ability to create routines that sound like actual songs that appeal to the public, how did he make this climb to fame? Let’s take a look back.

The 2017 Korea Beatbox Championship was the earliest video that I can find of him. It’s really impressive for the fact he was just bursting on to the scene as a nobody at that point but we knew he was going to be something special. The insane voice control and musicality that he possesses is insane and hard to replicate as well as being enjoyable to listen to. That’s a problem a lot of beatboxers can’t do to the general public. They can’t find the appeal but Bigman managed to as you’ll see later on. This was just the beginning of his rise to fame. One thing that I did notice was that his style in this battle was a lot different from his current style. He doesn’t use as much vocal bass but it’s still musical nonetheless.

His next battle would be By The JB Beatbox Battle. Still not where he got all of the fame from but this is where his current style really comes from. While he didn’t go far in the competition, he definitely left a mark for other competitors in the future. One of his signature routines was first showcased this elimination which is one of the best performances I’ve heard. It sounds like a song and that is what Bigman is capable of. Making his routines sound like actual songs.

I’ll be honest, I didn’t even know this was a video until I starting making this post. Anyways, you might recognize this routine from a later video. Not gonna spoil which one that is but it’s evident that Bigman likes to use a certain group of routines. That’s good as he knows what’s reliable but bad as it gets boring for the judges if he doesn’t innovate. Luckily for us and him, he’s innovated a lot since which is great. More for us and more for him.

Falling Love for KBTV. Remember the routine used in one of the previous videos? That would be this. This masterpiece of a routine is just beautiful to listen to. This would be the start of him going viral. There’s just one video that really kicked it off for the Korean guy and it’s this next one.

This wildcard is the single most viewed beatboxing video of the last year. It would be higher only if he didn’t accidentally delete the original but it’s the same video, just reuploaded. This is honestly the definition of a masterpiece. He combined a part of Falling Love into the wildcard as well as another routine that we’ll see later. There’s just something about this video that appeals to everyone. He’s so musical with his style but his style is so complex in musicality that it becomes technicality. That’s the beauty of musicality. Over time, it becomes technicality if it’s used in the right way and at the right time. He would end off placing top 8 after losing to Show-Go.

Die to Die marks Bigman’s only top 4 appearance as seen in this video. I couldn’t actually find his elimination round for some reason despite checking the playlist for the battles so this is what I chose. His top 4 round against Huckle. While he has demonstrated pause drops before, he really shows it in the second round especially. A really big accomplishment to make it that far.

Pepouni man. You should have featured this guy a lot earlier. You would have gotten a lot more views if you did. This one didn’t get as many views as the previous. In fact, it didn’t even come close to the previous but it was still great to listen to nonetheless. This is when he really got a lot of exposure to the beatboxing community. Swissbeatbox is really the hub for beatboxers to get their name out there in the community but he barely needed this as he already got his name out there through his wildcard. That wildcard attracted the attention of a famous celebrity with a famous show.

Ahh yes. Ellen Degeneres. How she found out about this guy, I have no idea. How Beat Rhino also got on the show, I also have no idea. There’s a lot of questions that I can’t answer to this video but that really doesn’t matter. Ellen’s humorous character makes for a great segment to watch nonetheless. And remember how I said his wildcard was the most viewed beatboxing video of last year? This makes a close second. Already we have 2 videos from Bigman that are 2 of the most viewed beatboxing videos of last year.

2 days in a row of Bigman? What universe do we live in? Who from the beatboxing gods has sent us 2 videos from this Korean master? Remember the wildcard that I said had another routine. This was it. I’m starting to catch a trend here that Bigman uses routines in his wildcards or eliminations before he uses them in a shoutout. This is probably to keep everything a surprise for the battles. He’s still innovating so people don’t know what to expect but it’s a good strategy nonetheless.

Roses are red

Violets are blue

There’s always an Asian

Better than you

Aside from that poem, you just combined 2 of Korea’s best beatboxers that burst on to the scene in similar ways (through a wildcard) and you combine it with the most viewed song on YouTube of all time and you get this. I don’t think these guys are a tag team because I haven’t seen them be together since as a team but boy they would be deadly. Hiss’ insane technicality plus is musicality combined with Bigman’s innovation and pure musicality and you get a fearsome Korean duo. And this is fifth in terms of views out of  all of the beatboxing videos uploaded last year which is just insane.

Has anyone noticed that all three of his named routines all have to do with love? Perfect that I was writing this on Valentine’s day but it’s being published the day after because it’s past midnight now but I’m going to keep pushing to get this post out. Bigman sort of went back to his old style with the more synthy style rather than full bass which is what we now hear him as. I can’t wait to see him at GBBB 2018 and I hope he does really well.

That pretty much wraps it up. This post took a long time to make from finding the videos to thinking about things to say for each of them so for the first time here on this page, please like this post. I haven’t asked for likes before but I think I can get a pass here. Let me know if I missed out any other significant videos and for who else I should do this sort of thing for.

With that being said, thank you very much for reading and have a wonderful day.

A Little Look at the Wildcards for GBBB 2018

If you thought last year’s wildcards were insane, this year’s has a whole new batch of insane. With 11 wildcards this year, there are sure to be upsets all throughout GBBB 2018. The wildcard winners for this year are:

  1. Show-Go
  2. Codfish
  3. Bigman
  4. D-Low
  5. Two.H
  6. H-Has
  7. Rythmind
  8. Chris Celiz
  9. Helium
  10. Piratheeban
  11. Ish

There are a lot of big names on this list, some are newcomers for their on the international scene and others are veterans making another appearance to hopefully take the title. Let’s run them down.

SHOW-GO:

This wildcard is definitely the best out of them all, hands down. His biggest strength is how well he uses double voice so it sounds musical. It’s one of the harder sounds to make sound really good musically but Show-go makes it work and it’s beautiful.

CODFISH:

Not enough people give shoutouts in their wildcards and Codfish found a wonderful to do it. Coming up with a new routine, Old Mate Firebender, combining it with his one of his best routines, Sail With Me, this is just one of the best ones I’ve heard. The shoutout is incorporated into the routine itself which is really smart. It’s really structured like a song where he has three verses and a beat that changes over the course of the song. This is definitely my favourite wildcard out of the bunch.

BIGMAN:

This guy is probably the most well-known beatboxer on this list because of his appearance on Ellen. Props to him for that. Coming up with a new routine, “I don’t love you,” I’m starting to sense a pattern here. Falling Love, Get Tired Of My Love, I Don’t Love You. I feel like an album is coming out based on the theme of love. Back to the point, THIS MAN IS A MUSICAL GENIUS. One of the reasons he’s so well-known is because musicality has taken over and if you don’t have musicality in your routines, you don’t make it in. He’s so musical to the point that it becomes technicality when you try to cover his routines. He also has a great singing voice to go along with it. He doesn’t appear to have that killer battle instinct which might hurt him but I would love to see him go all the way.

D-LOW:

D-low’s routines are a work of art. He always brings something new to the table. This really musical wildcard is an example of that. This is unlike anything we’ve seen D-low do before. He’s starting to go more away from liprolls and technicality but makes up for it in other areas and his uniqueness. There’s that sort of perfect style that one looks for over time and he’s slowly reaching it and perfecting it. He has that killer instinct to want to win and I want to see that from him.

TWO.H:

Two.H. GBBB finalist. Whenever Two.H comes out with a new routine or wildcard, he always brings something new to the table. His signature demon bass is something that I’d love to see more of. It’s so unique to him, it defines him and a lot of his routines and has potential to make the crowd go crazy. I want to see the Two.H from 3 years ago come back and go all the way.

H-HAS:

This guy, in my opinion, is like Hiss 2.0. He has that mix of technicality and musicality that works so well. He uses less technicality than Hiss but the drop in this wildcard with the bird sound tells me that he has a lot of potential left. This sort of style works so well because it’s enjoyable to listen to even if it’s put together like a freestyle. I think he’s going to be a sleeper in this competition.

RYTHMIND:

From the get-go of this wildcard, it has a really Reeps One sort of vibe with the different kinds of percussion he uses. This is soon seen to be changed as a cover of GDFR can be heard. It’s put in a really cool way though. There’s one massive flaw with this wildcard and that’s the lack of structure. The drop isn’t very noticeable because he doesn’t really build it. I do understand that Rythmind is more of a looper and a member of Berywam, one of the top beatboxing groups in the world, but this is something he really needs to develop in order to do well in the solos.

CHRIS CELIZ:

Out of all the wildcards submitted, this is probably the one that has received the most hate and I can see why. Even Chris himself said that he was surprised that he even got in. I think the hate really comes from the fact that the other wildcards were more technical and upbeat than this one. Whatever the reason is, Chris got in and he’s thankful for it. In terms of pure musicality, this one takes it as it’s not only a cover but also stays true to the song. By this, I mean that the cover still sounds like the song and not like a remix which can be heard from other beatboxers. Not much technicality can be heard and I don’t expect him to go far given his previous success at GBBB but I do expect his elimination round to be pretty entertaining.

HELIUM:

Helium has gone further and further away from his roots that made him famous, the zipper. He’s still known for using the zipper in ways that no one would expect but he’s starting to use them less and less and this is actually a good thing. This allows Helium to focus on other areas. His routines are more musical and technical. I was really surprised to hear him use double voice but it seems like he keeps up with the trends. I don’t really find him using a lot of prepared routines because he seems to be more of a freestyler which works fine for his style but if he brings a few routines with him, he could go really far.

PIRATHEEBAN:

One of the cleaner beatboxers in the competition, Piratheeban covers everything this routine. I would compare him this routine to Ball-Zee because of how clean and technical he is. He’s also very musical with this routine. I don’t find much wrong with this routine aside from a slight problem in the structure where he doesn’t build the drop *enough* but it’s noticeable and he’s a champion so I think he can get it done.

ISH:

Last time I heard from Ish was his wildcard for GNB earlier this year. He has improved a lot since then and it shows. He has more of that killer mentality where he wants to do well and try hard. I remember he lacked a lot of that confidence from last time and I love seeing that he’s finally got that confidence. He’s also built up the techniques and developed his style a lot more. Another good sleeper pick for GBBB and I’m really glad he got chosen as the people’s pick.

I do want to give a mention to other beatboxers that I thought could have made the list but didn’t. They include the following:

  • B-Art
  • Wing
  • Zekka
  • Elisii
  • FootboxG
  • Cosmin
  • MR MIC
  • Kevin O’Neal
  • MIXFX
  • Neolizer

I probably missed someone where there were so many stacked wildcards this year that I could understand the judges having difficulty choosing. Who do you think can make it all the way? Who do you think got left out? Leave your responses in the comments.

Other than that, thanks for reading.

Let’s Talk About Uniqueness

Being unique in the beatboxing community is really hard to accomplish. For the most part, beatboxers start by listening to others on Youtube and attempt to copy a beat from their favourite beatboxer. They like that person so much so they basically copy their style. Being exposed to other beatboxers is not a bad thing but it’s bad once you copy someone’s style almost completely as it’s frowned upon in the community. So how do you make your style unique?

Image result for unique

Source: http://unique-group.co.uk/ 

From my experience, I usually freestyle a lot and try and find a beat that is original that I’ve never heard before. I do this from using my arsenal of sounds and trial and error. Focusing on one signature sound is a good way to separate yourself from the crowd. TylaDubya is one of the best examples of this kind of uniqueness with his signature tongue bass that he uses in a lot of his routines like Primal Fear. A few other examples include Gene’s clicks, Dlow’s Dlow scratch, Napom’s liprolls, Ballzee’s bass, inward bass from pretty much every beatboxer out there and much more. Just using a single sound enough is enough to set you apart as people will associate that sound with your style.

Once you finally find a sound that you like and you want to base your style around, find other sounds that work with that sound. When choosing your signature sound, make sure it’s not used too much as it will take away from the appeal and you might just be called a spammer for it.

Finding a good balance and sounds that work well with your signature sound, now all you have to do is find a way to put it together. Routines are a really good way to showcase your style. The drop is typically where your sound is showcased. More on structure basics of a routine can be found in my post on Jigsaw by Gene and why it’s one of the best routines.

Understanding signature sounds, structure and having a variety of sounds that work together is all it takes to be unique. It will take you a while to find your style but stick to it and that’s what people will know you for.

Other than that, thanks for reading.

My 2017 Rising Star Audition at the CNE

Above this line is my audition video for the 2017 Rising Star Competition at the CNE. I’m really satisfied with the outcome of the video mainly because of the initial beat that I start off with. One thing that I should really get that I realised from this video is investing in a pop filter. There’s one part where you can hear the air clearly but the other parts are fine and have little to no air heard.

I am really looking forward to the Rising Star Competition and I wish the best of luck to those who auditioned as well and are wanting to get a spot in the elimination round. Good luck to all.

Other than that, thank for reading.

Why Jigsaw is One of the Best Beatboxing Routines

In 2015, Gene Shinozaki secured his place in the Grand Beatbox Battle 2015 with his wildcard routine called Jigsaw. This not only secured his place in the tournament but he won the whole thing. It’s regarded as one of the best routines to date and many people who I show it to say it’s the best routine they have heard. But why is it so popular not only among beatboxers but also people who don’t beatbox?

Before I start the breakdown of this monster of a routine, we need to understand the structure of a routine.

The parts go in this very rough order:

Buildup: sets the mood for the routine

Verse: acts like a verse in a song where it’s a melody that people remember

Pre-drop: prepares audience for the drop incoming

Drop: an area of the routine that gets people on their feet with something such as a signature sound

Hook: another area similar to the drop but the part is changed up with things like better technicality or musicality

End-off: how the routine ends off

The first part is the buildup. Gene uses a synth sound combined with his humming to set the tone. This is really musical and sets the tone for a good music filled routine. People who are not into beatboxing like this more than something like lip rolls or inward bass because it’s more relatable and likeable for them than the sounds that beatboxers use.

The second part is the verse. Gene likes to use a lot of composer elements in his routines and he shows it off here with his insane musicality during the verse. He also likes to sing in his routines which are nothing new but the lyrics mean a lot and for non-beatboxers, this really catches on for them. The lyrics make a lot of sense. Gene is a jigsaw puzzle piece trying to fit into the puzzle or like a person trying to fit into the world.

The third part is the pre-drop. It’s the area before the drop and lets the audience know that the drop is coming. People like to use lyrics sometimes with some sort of drop joke such as, “drop it” or something like that but Gene, once again, does something different and uses a good buildup through his sounds and musicality. You start to see a trend with the amount of musicality that he uses in this routine which makes it enjoyable to listen to.

The fourth part is the drop, the most memorable part of any routine. Gene is referred to as “The Godfather of Clicks” and it’s easy to see why. This click drop is done of the best drops I have heard combined with the cough snares in between the clicks every third beat. This drop is compared to EDM songs such as Animals by Martin Garrix due to the clicks (Gene has done a cover of Animals as well). The drop is really well executed and sounds really good as well.

The fifth part is the hook. It ties back to the drop and this time, he adds a bunch of pops with the clicks. It sounds really technical. He has the musicality and the technicality to blow anyone away as long as they aren’t a hater of his or a hater of beatboxing. The technicality he adds showcases every part of a good routine but it needs to end well. That’s where the end-off comes in.

And we reach the end-off as the last part. The end-off is a tad bit rough but people don’t really notice it. The end-off touches back on the verse with the same humming he uses in the buildup without the synth. The end-off ties the whole routine together.

Gene does an exceptional job of showcasing all the elements of a good routine. He has structure, flow, musicality, technicality and originality. It’s no wonder why he won the whole tournament. With a great performance like this, who knows what the next great routine will be.

This has been my breakdown of Jigsaw by Gene Shinozaki. Other than that, thank you for reading.